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rubywhiterabbit:

My little brother got into outer space and stuff so my step-mom bought him a place mat with all the planets on it. When I first saw it, I was upset, because it was newer and so Pluto wasn’t labeled. I was about to say something when I noticed something…

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Pluto is there.

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The artist remembered Pluto.

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Guys…

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The artist drew Pluto crying.

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avi-tron:

thinking of getting these

avi-tron:

thinking of getting these

(Source: what-do-i-wear, via joyfolds)

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charlessantoso:

RANDOM WORD DOODLES: Here’s number [50] of the series. You don’t want to know whose brain the mouse is playing with :3 Hope you enjoy.

charlessantoso:

RANDOM WORD DOODLES: Here’s number [50] of the series. You don’t want to know whose brain the mouse is playing with :3 Hope you enjoy.

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(Source: coffeepeople, via i-love-art)

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lloogg:

Ještěd Tower marble stairway by celie on Flickr.
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throwing lamps at people who need to lighten up

(Source: hashgag, via whatgatsby)

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almostoutofminutes:

mirrizzingtonfizzington:

omg photogenic guys laugh???

(Source: niallsavemetonight)

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(Source: neako, via thehungryarchitect)

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endofmarch:


part 1 of “A Primer for the Small Weird Loves” from Crush by Richard Siken

I think this is my favourite from this collection along with “Scheherazade”. Though I still have to explore it further.

endofmarch:

part 1 of “A Primer for the Small Weird Loves” from Crush
by Richard Siken

I think this is my favourite from this collection along with “Scheherazade”. Though I still have to explore it further.

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darksilenceinsuburbia:

Georg Herold.

Georg Herold’s arching and stretching anthropomorphic sculptures from 2010 suggest an ambiguous, self-aware state of tension. The crude stick figure minimalism of the two reclining bodies contrasts with the visceral nature of their poses. There is something fetishistic about these figures: one looks like it’s being dragged along the ground with its hands tied up; the other exaggeratedly bends its back in an overtly sexualised and gendered stance. The viewer is left to take in the weird conceptual paradox they embody: the objectifying dehumanisation they point to and the very human artifice of their construction – they are made out of roof battens, canvas, lacquer thread and screws, materials which the artist has been working with for decades. (by Honey)

(via bettafish-resistance)